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On the Streets: Loveless on Capitol Hill

My favorite coffee shop in Seattle's Capitol Hill neighborhood is Joe Bar. It's one of the first coffee shops I visited when I moved to Capitol Hill, and I liked the people and the place immediately. I didn't immediately like the building it's in. It was designed by architect Arthur Loveless, and I think it is now generally recognized as the Loveless Building. I can't remember why I didn't like it, but the reason isn't important. I love the building now.

 Joe Bar, Capitol Hill, Seattle.

Joe Bar, Capitol Hill, Seattle.

 Loveless Building, Capitol Hill, Seattle.

Loveless Building, Capitol Hill, Seattle.

 Cook | Weaver and Joe Bar, two great Loveless Building anchors. Capitol Hill, Seattle.

Cook | Weaver and Joe Bar, two great Loveless Building anchors. Capitol Hill, Seattle.

 "Womans Century Club", across the street from the Loveless Building, Capitol Hill, Seattle. I took this photo in February 2017 as this building was being renovated and readied for a post-Harvard Exit life. It stayed empty for a while, but Capitol Hill Seattle reported that it is going to be the new site of the Mexican Consulate.

"Womans Century Club", across the street from the Loveless Building, Capitol Hill, Seattle. I took this photo in February 2017 as this building was being renovated and readied for a post-Harvard Exit life. It stayed empty for a while, but Capitol Hill Seattle reported that it is going to be the new site of the Mexican Consulate.

Arthur Loveless was well-known for his Tudor Revivalist style. I'm not sure what that means exactly (if you do, please feel free to comment below). After I post this I'm going to revisit the history of the Tudor line. I assume Tudor Revivalist was a fresh take on that era's architectural styles, but I'm not sure if it entails something more than that. It's a distinctive look, and it's grown on me. I like the brick and the turrets. I'm not a fan of the white panel sections framed by wood. I'm not sure if that's a signature element, and I might be mixing up styles.

In the 15 months I've lived on Capitol Hill, I've noticed a lot of Tudor Revivalist homes and apartment buildings. I'm curious about how many of them are Loveless projects. I'm also curious about what made that style popular at that time. Was it a nation-wide trend or something more local? And since photographers are always thinking up projects to work on, I decided I'd try to get pictures of the Loveless projects on Capitol Hill. It's just a minor project; I'm sure the homes have been thoroughly documented. But it will be another good excuse to walk around this fantastic neighborhood.

The idea has already led to a few fun discoveries. After a quick Google search I found a great site focusing on Washington history - History Link, "a free online encyclopedia of Washington State History." They have an excellent two-part introduction to the Capitol Hill neighborhood. The following excerpt covers the Loveless Building.

The 1931 addition of architect Arthur Loveless’s North Broadway Shopping Center, the “English cottage” next door to the DAR, made this two-block stretch of unique architecture a Seattle landmark of great distinction. Adding the many great homes to the north of Roy Street and to the west of Broadway Avenue amounts to what for many is the most charmed part of Capitol Hill. Included there (at 750 Belmont Avenue) is the first luxury apartment house designed by Frederick William Anhalt (1896-1996).
— History Link

After reading that excerpt I went off in search of 750 Belmont Avenue. I think it has held up pretty well.

 750 Belmont Avenue, Capitol Hill, Seattle.

750 Belmont Avenue, Capitol Hill, Seattle.

Here are a few more from the neighborhood. In a month or two I'll compile the photos and see if they warrant putting into a gallery page.

 Belmont Avenue, Capitol Hill, Seattle.

Belmont Avenue, Capitol Hill, Seattle.

 Capitol Hill, Seattle, near Roy and Broadway.

Capitol Hill, Seattle, near Roy and Broadway.

 Capitol Hill, Seattle, near the intersection of Roy and Broadway.

Capitol Hill, Seattle, near the intersection of Roy and Broadway.

 Capitol Hill, Seattle, near Roy and Broadway.

Capitol Hill, Seattle, near Roy and Broadway.

For further reading:

Josh Mahar profiled the Loveless Building in a 2009 piece for the Capitol Hill Seattle Blog. (I like the term blog. I blog. But in this instance I don't think it adequately conveys that the folks at Capitol Hill Seattle are turning out high quality local news. They also have an excellent photojournalist on their staff - Alex Garland.)

Note: I'll look into changing the bold from red to black.