You should read Charles Mudede. Remember those Most Interesting Man in the World ads? Mudede’s a kindred spirit.

In his 23 July column in The Stranger, Mudede laments the closing of Seattle’s College Inn Pub. Mudede writes wonderfully, relating his fondness for the bar to PBS’s The Paper Chase. He also talks about the people who made the bar special.

I regret not having visited. When I first moved to Seattle I lived in Fremont and would go to the Pacific Inn Pub. That place had fantastic bartenders and regulars (I say had only because some of the bartenders I knew have left). No accident that Bourdain made it a stop on a Seattle visit. I asked Valerie about some of her favorite Seattle bars. She mentioned that the College Inn Pub was their sister bar. I don’t think it was the same ownership or any formal connection. I might be wrong.

Another cool morning in Seattle. I suspect it won’t last. I’m trying to enjoy it. The hammering in the distance isn’t too bad. I know I’m getting repetitive, but it always amazes me to see the number of buildings going up in Capitol Hill. I hope an organized, disciplined local photographer has been methodically capturing all the changes.

Crisp mornings welcome a stove-cooked breakfast. Another shot at an omelette? For inspiration I watched the final scene in Big Night. A favorite movie. I won’t ruin it for anyone, but the last scene is amazing. I’ve always thought it was an omelette, but now I think it’s something in between an omelette and scrambled eggs. I tried to make that this morning, and I’m not really sure what to call the result. But I ate it, and it was good.

I thought about heating a tortilla to go with it, but the eggs set and cooked so fast that it looked like I was in at least the same zip code as an omelette. Seemed strange to wrap a tortilla around an omelette. Not sure why I thought that.

Tortillas are weird. I think eating a tortilla straight out of a plastic bag from the refrigerator is gross. Believe me, I’ve done the research. I’m not proud of it. But something magical happens when you heat a tortilla. It’s the food equivalent of alchemy. Agree? I can’t remember the last time I have had a wrap. Do wraps just use cold tortillas?

Charlie Warzel at the New York Times has become one of my favorite writers. Fair, practical, compassionate. I think he’s onto something with his latest column, but I admit that a lot of it went over my head. I just know there’s something strange going on with writers on the left and right. I can’t explain what I mean about strange and won’t really try. I don’t want to sound like I’m buying into the horseshoe theory, because I’m skeptical of the endless parade of theories that get thrown our way. It sometimes feels like it’s getting harder and harder to find well-reasoned discussions not designed for useless twitter threads.

Oh, but it’s not. I’ll catch up on Mudede’s columns.